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20131202
20131210
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tools such as satellites. the impending exhaustion of energy and mineral supplies had been predicted before-- in 1908, 1944, 1952. by now many minerals should be extinct. none is. a major survival factor has been substitution between metals and between alternative forms of energy. such conservation will continue to prevent long-run shortages. besides, the earth's crust is 30 miles thick. we've barely scratched thsurf no wonder the doomsayers have been proved wrong. it seems unlikely that economic growth will stop because of too many people, too much pollution, too few resources. yet worldwide, there are vast differences between standards of living. in the next century, americans may accept lower growth rates as the rest of the world catches up. even though we've come to a slowdown, this is nothing fatal, not a collapse, as limits suggests. low growth rate is not as good as high, but it's certainly better than stagnation. the real point of these models is that man can learn to control his own future. we do have an influence on our future. we can think about what we want it to be and p
. well, by the time you get involved in that, everybody's sweating and pouring on the energy and slowing down. they're no longer where they were when they came into the room. it's a different place, and i think it's magic. ♪ on my way. (narrator) the power of music itself can be the force that draws people together. ♪ i would like to reach out my hand. ♪ at rock and roll concerts world-wide, musical performance often facilitates the creation of community. large concerts such as those by the pittsburgh-based band rusted root are highly interactive and transformative events that bring participants together in ways that often transcend the performance itself. ♪ send me on my way. ♪ on my way. ♪ send me on my way. (man) i think the question of what is powerful about music or musical experience is very interesting, because i think it goes beyond the scales that are being performed or the particular rhythms or even necessarily the execution of it. i think that the environment that's created between the band and the audience provides some sort of emotional venue in which many magica
, the rebirth of its intellectual energy came from a rediscovery of classical culture. without ever leaving santa croce, we can move into the world of the renaissance with this tomb of leonardo bruni, longtime chancellor of florence, who died in 1444. this was the florence of humanists, the students of the classics, of the knowledge and the wisdom of the ancient world. they went right back to the great greek philosophers. he also wrote a history of florence, starting with roman times. and in this great work, he put historical writing onto a new footing, both in terms of its literary content and its scholarly underpinning. and there he lies, his history on his breast, surrounded by wealth of classical detail, his bier supported by the roman eagles and his hope of heaven in the roundel of the virgin and child above his head. this monument in itself is a wordless combination of the christian and the classical. this is the pantheon, the most perfectly preserved temple of ancient rome. scholars like bruni and the artists of renaissance florence had a passionate love affair with antiquity. the hu
't have any appetite, and i lost all my energy. >> doctors discovered lauren's heart was seriously damaged. >> so...it was just [exhales] a complete shock, just to know that from one day to the next, i'd gone, like... i was never born with any defect or anything. i had simply just caught a virus that attacked my heart. >> that's how lauren wound up on a list -- the long, long list of americans waiting for a transplant. >> we have, nationwide, 117,000 people are waiting for a life-saving organ transplant, and simply put, there are not enough people registered as organ donors to save -- to save lives. >> fortunately for lauren, a donor came through in time. she received her new heart and started on the road to recovery. she spent so much time in the hospital, she and her mother created a book about her experience. wanting to make a difference, lauren teamed up with the organization donate life. they urge people to enroll as organ donors. >> my friend lauren received a heart transplant. i have a liver transplant. and we have -- between us, we have about nine extra yearof life already. >> so,
for work in mexico. mexico's resume as a host to employers looked ideal. it had ready supplies of energy, access to the huge consumer markets of the united states, and most important of all, a large labor force. but for years, much of mexico's labor force sat idle, the result of policies that excluded job-creating foreign investment, policies followed by the governments of both xico and the unedtates. was there a solution, one that would attract investment to mexico and induce mexican workers to look for work at home? the maquiladora was one solution. border factories in which mexican workers assembled u.s.-made components for export with reduced tariffs to the american market. what did the maquiladora offer to the two sides of the border? it's a twofold process which involves both mexico opening its border originally only on an experimental basis, and creating a free trade zone which would be an incentive for foreign companies to manufacture in mexico. from the point of view of american companies, the interest was to be able to find more hospitable conditions of production, including lo
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5